Let Them Get Wet!

Let Them Get Wet!

Encouraging children to play outdoors is one of the best things we can do for them. In fact, it’s essential for their health and wellbeing.

There are so many advantages. When children go outside they:

  • burn more calories, especially if it’s cold, reducing the risk of obesity;

  • develop better coordination;

  • develop better physical fitness;

  • produce more vitamin D (vitamin D is important for good bones); and

  • get exposure to bacteria and microbes that help boost their resistance to disease.

Brushing Teeth

Brushing Teeth

Few young children are consistently cooperative when it comes to brushing teeth.

And of course, even if they're keen, young children lack the manual dexterity to do a thorough job.

Brushing properly and regularly doesn’t just benefit our children while they are growing up; it sets the stage for a lifetime of great teeth, good oral hygiene, and easy dental check-ups.

Supporting Scissor Skills

Supporting Scissor Skills

Using scissors is a skill that is not always easy to master for pre-schoolers with tiny hands.

It’s an important skill that prepares children for handwriting and using a pencil.

In order to master scissors, a child needs to be able to use their index finger, middle finger, and thumb separately from their other fingers. You can help your pre-schooler develop their scissor skills by introducing them to activities that strengthen their hand and finger muscles and improve their bilateral coordination.

A New Sibling

A New Sibling

When a new brother or a sister arrives on the scene existing children have some adjusting to do.

Generally, children between 18 months and three years old have the hardest time adjusting (children under 18 months have fewer problems because they don't realise how life is changing for them, and once past three, children generally handle frustrating situations better).